Self-isolation support payment

From Monday, 28 September 2020, you are required by law to self-isolate if you are told to do so by NHS Test and Trace.

The Government has introduced a £500 support payment to help people on low incomes who have to self-isolate. The scheme will run until 31 January 2021 but is being kept under review by the Government. We are responsible for making the payments. Please read all of the information on this page before applying.

Do I qualify for this scheme?

To qualify for the payment, you will need to meet all of the criteria below:

  • you have been asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace on or after 28 September, 2020
  • you are employed or self-employed
  • you cannot work from home and will lose money as a result
  • you are claiming at least one of the following benefits: Universal Credit, Working Tax Credits, income-related Employment and Support Allowance, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit or Housing Benefit

Who cannot apply for a payment?

You cannot apply for this scheme if:

  • You do not have a valid notification from NHS Test and Trace
  • You have been told to self-isolate before the 28 September, 2020. This applies even if your period of self-isolation overlaps this date
  • You are self-isolating after returning from abroad (unless you have tested positive for Covid-19 and been told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace)
  • You can work from home while self-isolating
  • You are not claiming one of the benefits listed. You may qualify for help from the local discretionary self-isolation support scheme.

What proof do I need to provide?

To prove you are eligible for the scheme, you will need to fill in the online application form on this page and provide the following information:

  • a notification from NHS Test and Trace asking you to self-isolate (this will include a Unique ID number)
  • a bank statement
  • proof of employment, or, if you are self-employed, evidence of self-assessment returns, trading income and proof that your business delivers services which cannot be undertaken without social contact

Local discretionary self-isolation support scheme

If you meet all the other criteria for the self-isolation support payment, but you are not claiming one of the benefits listed and self-isolating will cause you severe financial hardship, then you may still qualify for help from the local discretionary self-isolation support scheme.

If you believe this applies to you, please fill in the application form on this page as normal, but when you get to question 16 about claiming benefits, click ‘none of these’. Carry on and complete and submit the form. We will then assess your circumstances and contact you with our decision.

Can other people I am living with make a claim?

If there are other people living in your household, then they can make their own application to the scheme, as long as they meet the eligibility criteria.

Can I claim on someone else’s behalf?

You can apply on someone else’s behalf, but the £500 must be paid into the bank account in the name of the person you are applying on behalf of. For example, if you are applying on behalf of a parent, the money must be paid into your parent’s bank account.

I have been asked to self-isolate more than once. Can I claim again?

If you are told to self-isolate more than once, you will be able to apply for the payment again, as long as you still meet the eligibility criteria and your periods of self-isolation do not overlap.

Can I claim if I have been furloughed?

You can claim the payment if you have been furloughed, as long as you meet all the other qualifying criteria.

How long do I have to claim?

You can make a claim up to 14 days after your self-isolation period ends, as long as it started on or after 28 September 2020.

Apply for a self-isolation support payment

Self-isolation support payment application

If you are unable to complete this form online, or need help completing it, then please call 01684 862413.

Privacy

Read the  pdfself-isolation support payment privacy notice (107 KB)  to find out how we will use your personal data to process your application.

Other financial support

If you are on a low income but do not qualify for a self-isolation support payment, or the local discretionary scheme, then you may be able to apply for Statutory Sick Pay, Universal Credit or another benefit.

Financial support if you cannot work because of Covid-19

Other help while you are self-isolating

If you need help while you are self-isolating, such as deliveries of food or medicine, then please fill in the Worcestershire Here 2 Help I need help form.

Limited Care Home visits to begin again in Worcestershire

Published Monday, 19th October 2020

 

Families across Worcestershire can now be reunited with loved ones in care homes.

Worcestershire County Council Public Health has considered the current situation and the impact the closure of care homes, is having on families and residents.
The decision has been taken to advise care homes that limited visits to residents can now be arranged, providing strict safety measures are in place to protect vulnerable residents.

Extra Care and Supported Living will also be advised they can open to limited family visits again.

All visitors will be asked to follow strict visiting rules, and individual care homes will need to regularly assess their residents’ needs and vulnerabilities, to ensure visits continue to be conducted as safely as possible.

Dr. Kathryn Cobain, Director for Public Health for Worcestershire said: “ Our first priority must always be the safety and health of our most vulnerable, poorly and elderly residents. Restricting visits to care homes was a very difficult decision, and we promised we would continue to monitor the impact this would have. It is always a question of balancing protection from Covid-19, with the mental health and emotional wellbeing aspects of restricting family contact. With these considerations in mind, we have decided to advise that care homes can re-open to limited visitors, providing there are stringent safety measures in place. I hope this will ease worry and anxiety for Worcestershire families and I thank our residents, families, and care homes for working with us to protect loved ones.”

Councillor Adrian Hardman, Cabinet Member with Responsibility for Adult Social Care said; “Thank you to every family who has had to sacrifice visiting their loved ones in order to keep them safe. We know this was extremely difficult and upsetting, and we thank you for co-operating fully to protect those we love. I hope the re-opening of care homes for visits will bring comfort and reassurance. When you visit, please follow the rules, they are there to protect everyone. Covid-19 is on the rise still, we must take it as seriously as ever.”

 

 

Christmas Collections

It might still seem some time off (or maybe not if you venture into the supermarkets and see all their festive stuff!) but Christmas is fast approaching and we have just agreed the Christmas collection schedules for refuse, recycling and Garden Waste.

 

This year’s impact is limited to the Friday of each week. Attached are the picture files for domestic and Garden Waste collections

 

christmas domestic collection 2020

christmas garden waste collection 2020

Local COVID alert levels: what you need to know

Local COVID alert levels: what you need to know

Information on local COVID alert levels, including what they mean, why they are being introduced and what the different levels are.

What local COVID alert levels mean

Local COVID alert levels set out information for local authorities, residents and workers about what to do and how to manage the outbreak in their area.

Find out what you can and cannot do if you live, work or travel in each local COVID alert level.

Check the local COVID alert level of your local area to see which level applies to you.

Why the government is introducing local COVID alert levels

The government is committed to ensuring the right levels of intervention in the right places to manage outbreaks. Working with local authorities through the contain framework, our approach has been simplified so that there are now 3 local COVID alert levels.

Local COVID alert level: medium

This is for areas where national restrictions continue to be in place.

This means:

  • you must not socialise in groups larger than 6, indoors or outdoors (other than where a legal exemption applies)
  • businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-secure manner, other than those that remain closed in law
  • certain businesses are required to ensure customers only consume food and drink while seated, and must close between 10pm and 5am
  • businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • schools and universities remain open
  • places of worship remain open, subject to the rule of 6
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on numbers of attendees
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors, or indoors if the rule of 6 is followed

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • when travelling, plan ahead or avoid busy times and routes. Walk or cycle if you can

Find out more about the measures that apply in medium alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Local COVID alert level: high

This is for areas with a higher level of infections where some additional restrictions are in place.

This means on top of restrictions in alert level medium:

  • you must not socialise with anybody outside of your household or support bubble in any indoor setting, whether at home or in a public place
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than 6 outside, including in a garden or other spaces like beaches or parks (other than where specific exemptions apply in law)
  • businesses and venues can continue to operate, in a COVID-secure manner, other than those that remain closed in law
  • certain businesses are required to ensure customers only consume food and drink while seated, and must close between 10pm and 5am
  • businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises can continue to do so after 10pm as long as this is through delivery service, click-and-collect or drive-through
  • schools, universities and places of worship remain open
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors. These will only be permitted indoors if it is possible for people to avoid mixing with people they do not live with or share a support bubble with, or for youth or disability sport
  • you can continue to travel to venues or amenities that are open, for work or to access education, but should look to reduce the number of journeys you make where possible

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • walk or cycle where possible, or plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport

Find out more about the measures that apply in high alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Local COVID alert level: very high

This is for areas with a very high level of infections and where tighter restrictions are in place. The restrictions placed on areas with a very high level of infections can vary, and are based on discussions between central and local government. You should therefore check the specific rules in your area.

At a minimum, this means:

  • you must not socialise with anybody you do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events
  • you must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue
  • pubs and bars must close. They can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant, which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal
  • schools and universities remain open
  • places of worship remain open, but household mixing is not permitted
  • weddings and funerals can go ahead with restrictions on the number of attendees. However, wedding receptions are not allowed
  • exercise classes and organised sport can continue to take place outdoors. These will only be permitted indoors if it is possible for people to avoid mixing with people they do not live with (or share a support bubble with), or for youth or disability sport
  • you should try to avoid travelling outside the very-high alert level area you are in or entering a very-high alert level area, other than for things like work, education or youth services, to meet caring responsibilities or if you are travelling through as part of a longer journey
  • you should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if you are resident in a very-high alert level area, or avoid staying overnight in a very-high alert level area if you are resident elsewhere

You must:

You should continue to:

  • follow social distancing rules
  • work from home where you can effectively do so
  • travel to venues or amenities that are open, for work or to access education, but aim to reduce the number of journeys you make

This is the baseline in very-high alert level areas. The government will also seek to agree additional interventions in consultation with local authorities, in order to drive down transmission of the virus. These could include the following options:

  • restrictions preventing the sale of alcohol in hospitality or closing all hospitality (except takeaway and delivery)
  • closing indoor and outdoor entertainment venues and tourist attractions
  • closing venues such as leisure centres and gyms (while ensuring provision remains available for elite athletes, youth and disabled sport and physical activity)
  • closing public buildings, such as libraries and community centres (while ensuring provision remains available for youth and childcare activities and support groups)
  • closing personal care and close contact services or prohibiting the highest-risk activities
  • closing performing arts venues for the purposes of performing to audiences

You should therefore check whether additional restrictions apply in your area.

Find out more about the measures that apply in very high alert level areas to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.